“All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of thing shall be well.”

These words were penned by fourteenth century English mystic Julian of Norwich in what would come to be known as her Showings. They have become a source of encouragement to many in times of uncertainty and turbulence; indeed, I have often quoted them myself. In the turbulent aftermath of the US presidential election, I have already seen them offered as a note of much-needed comfort to those who are understandably fearful about the future of America and the world.

However, I think a note of caution is required as regards how we understand these famous words.

It’s tempting to see Lady Julian’s words as an assurance that nothing bad will happen to us: that, whatever might befall us, there will always be some kind of providential safety net to protect us from the worst. But that cannot be so, for two reasons. First, Julian is thought to have written these words while deathly ill; as such, whatever it was that moved her to write them, it was not a firm conviction that she would recover and live to a ripe old age. (In fact, she did recover and live for another thirty-three years, but that’s another story.) And second, we clearly live in a world in which dreadful and deadly things can and do happen to even the most godly and selfless people.

That being the case, to attempt to use these words as a shield against the vagaries of life is to distort them into a cheap platitude that denies the reality both of the circumstances in which they were written and of the world as we know it.

How, then, are we to understand and take encouragement from Lady Julian’s affirmation? I think there are two ways we can do so.

First, Julian’s words remind us that, no matter how great the storm that encircles us, it is possible for us to be truly at peace with ourselves and the world; not easy, but possible. To achieve this kind of inner peace takes great self-awareness and a determined pursuit of inner silence and solitude – things Lady Julian herself pursued to what most would consider an extreme degree. In this way, it is possible for us to sincerely assert that “all is well” even in the midst of the storm, just as nineteenth century hymn-writer Horatio Spafford was able to write the famous words “It is well with my soul” even in the wake of his financial ruin and the tragic deaths of all five of his children.

And second, as those who believe that death has been swallowed up in the victory of resurrection, we can genuinely hold fast to the truth that even if the very worst should happen, it will not be the end of the story. This is surely how Lady Julian was able to remain resolutely hopeful even in the face of what she probably assumed was her imminent death.

So, in these uncertain times, let us be encouraged, and let us encourage one another, but not with trite and hollow promises about an earthly future none of us can predict. Rather, let us seek the kind of peace that is offered by the Prince of Peace, and let us hold firmly to the hope that even death, should it unexpectedly come knocking, is not the end, but merely a doorway to another part of the journey.

[ Image: Ian ]